Clark County asks for public feedback regarding short term rental regulations

New short-term rental regulations approved in Clark County

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LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Soon, new regulations will kick in for short-term rentals in Clark County. Commissioners voted to approve new regulations on where they can go and how many there will be.

There are expected to be 3,000 legally operating Airbnb’s in county areas, but experts have said there are already thousands more than that operating, and some have concerns about how this will play out.

“Those properties are helping families who want to come here and vacation,” said owner of Vice Realty Derek Moellinger. “Obviously Las Vegas is a huge destination.”

Vice Realty helps people looking for Airbnb’s. It’s an industry where people can make a lot of money.

On Tuesday, the county approved new regulations with several rules, including one license per person, max occupancy set at two people per bedroom or 10 people per unit, and a minimum of two-night stays.

The other big rule is that short-term rentals must be 1,000 feet from each other.

“Right now, people are really confused, they don’t know what the law is, what the law isn’t, or how they will get their places legally compliant,” Moellinger said.

Moellinger said he estimates there are around 12,000 short-term rentals operating now in the county, but the county is only permitting 3,000 of them. He added that he’s worried people with existing ones may sell.

“This is people’s business, and they don’t know what’s going to happen to it over the next six months,” he said. “An average family home that is three-bed, two-bath and I get $1,800 a month for it and I was getting $10,000 on Airbnb, my profit margin is lower.”

The county plans to step up enforcement as well.

“It’s important to remember Airbnb is illegal in Clark County, the fact that we’re getting our hands around it is the most important part,” said County Commissioner Tick Segerblom.

Segerblom noted there will be a 24-hour phone number for people to report issues to the county.

“We’re going to hire new code enforcement officers who can go out when we get a complaint,” he said.

CAMCO operates HOA’s across the valley. CEO Joel Just said that the company is having to look into how to regulate this moving forward.

“We do have attorneys that represent the HOA and they’re looking at what are the responsibilities of the HOA,” he said.

Moellingher also added that he thinks a lot more reporting will happen between Airbnb hosts. The application process will start in September, but regulations will go into place next spring.



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